The eastbourne manslaughter

Eastbourne manslaughter explained R v Hopley more commonly known as the Eastbourne manslaughter was an legal case in EastbourneEngland, concerning the death of year-old Reginald Cancellor some sources give his name as Chancellor and his age as 13 or 14 [1] at the hands of his teacher, Thomas Hopley. As a result of the inquest Hopley was arrested and charged with manslaughter. He was found guilty at trial and sentenced to four years in prison, although he insisted that his actions were justifiable and that he was not guilty of any crime.

The eastbourne manslaughter

Background

As a result of the inquest Hopley was arrested and charged with manslaughter. He was found guilty at trial and sentenced to four years in prison, although he insisted that his actions were justifiable and that he was not guilty of any crime.

The trial was sensationalised by the Victorian press and incited debate over the use of corporal punishment in schools. The case became an important legal precedent in the United Kingdom for discussions of corporal punishment in schools and reasonable limits on discipline.

Background Thomas Hopley, aged 41 at the time of the incident, was a schoolmaster in Eastbourne who ran a private boarding school out of his home at 22 Grand-parade. He was well educated and from a middle-class family, the son of a Royal Navy surgeon and brother of artist Edward Hopley.

His household was fairly well off, and he and his wife kept several servants. He expressed "utopian" educational ideals shared by many Victorian educational theorists.

Leonards and under a private tutor.

Eastbourne manslaughter is a featured article; it (or a previous version of it) has been identified as one of the best articles produced by the Wikipedia community. Even . Reddit gives you the best of the internet in one place. Get a constantly updating feed of breaking news, fun stories, pics, memes, and videos just for you. Passionate about something niche? Reddit has thousands of vibrant communities with people that share your interests. Alternatively, find out what’s trending across all of Reddit on r/popular. In October of Thomas Hopley was hired as a private tutor for a young teen named Reginald Channell Cancellor in Eastbourne, England. Reginald needed special care that regular schools couldn’t provide.

He was not a good student, with contemporary sources suggesting he "had water on the brain " and describing him as "stolid and stupid". His body was covered, with long stockings over his legs and kidskin gloves on his hands. The only visible part of the body was his face.

His thighs were "reduced to a perfect jelly" and his body was covered in bruises and cuts, including two inch-deep holes in his right leg, [23] deep enough to allow the medical examinerRobert Willis, to touch the bone underneath.

Willis reported that other than these injuries, the boy was healthy and his internal organs including the heart were free of disease. Two other servants testified in the inquiry and gave similar accounts. He had failed to summon a doctor immediately and, upon questioning, had given outlandish excuses for his failure to do so.

SAILOR GUILTY OF MANSLAUGHTER - Eastbourne Herald

He and his then-pregnant wife spent the period between the initial hearing and the trial at Uckfield. He received a large amount of hate mail from anonymous members of the public. The prosecutors were Parry and Knapp; Hopley was defended by the serjeant-at-law William Ballantinewho subsequently described Hopley as "distorted".

Hopley presented testimonials from past students who described him as "kindly" and who noted an infrequent use of violence. Hopley claimed to be a paedagogical follower of John Lockewho had decried the use of corporal punishment except in cases of extreme obstinacy on the part of the student.

He argued that, through the application of this theory, the beating that killed Cancellor had been a necessary one. Although he promoted the testimonials of former students and argued that a schoolmaster was unlikely to "so lightly jeopardize his ambitions", he congratulated Locock on the accuracy of his testimony in open court.

By the law of England, a parent or a schoolmaster who for this purpose represents the parent and has the parental authority delegated to himmay for the purpose of correcting what is evil in the child, inflict moderate and reasonable corporal punishment, always, however, with the condition, that it is moderate and reasonable.

I searched and searched among the deepest secrets of my soul, and could not blame myself I could look up tranquilly into the face of heaven who knew me to be Not Guilty.

The eastbourne manslaughter

He portrayed himself as a victim of public opinion, claiming that "a mournful accident was swelled up into a bloody midnight murder, and how it has been brought about that my unfortunate name has been branded, not simply through the United Kingdom, but through the civilised world, as one of the most execrable monsters or of madmen.

The press derided Hopley as "monstrous", and criticised schoolteachers in general and private schoolteachers in particular. To prevent overcrowding, the court issued tickets for admission to the public gallery during the trial; [29] the courtroom was full an hour before the trial began.

Talk:Eastbourne manslaughter - Wikipedia WaltonMerseysideEngland Two-year-old James Patrick Bulger was killed in February by two year-old boys, Jon Venables and Robert Thompson, after they lured him away from a shopping centre to a nearby railway line where they tortured and beat him before leaving him on a railway track to die of his injuries. They spent eight years in custody before being released on life licence in
Rail transport in East Sussex His household was fairly well off, and he and his wife kept several servants. Leonards and under a private tutor.

His wife, Fanny, had petitioned for divorce on the grounds that he was "unloving" and had mistreated her. She accused him of physically abusing her from the time of her first pregnancy, beating his first child only days after its birth the child was later found to be "brain-damaged"[7] and suggesting that during his prison sentence she should be confined to a workhouse.

Hopley responded by claiming that he set rules only to ensure the maintenance of his household and the well-being of his family, and produced a set of romantic letters he had received from Fanny during his incarceration as evidence of her unforced affection for him. The jury found Hopley guilty of cruelty, but suggested that Fanny had condoned his treatment of her.stubbornness on Cancellor's part, but instead beat the boy to death.

An inquest into Cancellor's death began when his brother requested an autopsy. As a result of the inquest Hopley was arrested and charged with manslaughter. He was found guilty at trial and sentenced to four years in prison.

Eastbourne manslaughter Save R v Hopley (more commonly known as the Eastbourne manslaughter) was an legal case in Eastbourne, England, concerning the death of year-old Reginald Cancellor (some sources give his name as Chancellor [1] and his age .

Eastbourne manslaughter explained R v Hopley (more commonly known as the Eastbourne manslaughter) was an legal case in Eastbourne, England, concerning the death of year-old Reginald Cancellor (some sources give his name as Chancellor and his age as 13 or 14) [1] at the hands of his teacher, Thomas Hopley.

Jan 16,  · The Eastbourne manslaughter (R v Hopley) was an legal case in Eastbourne, England, about the death of a teenage . Jan 17,  · Eastbourne manslaughter The Eastbourne manslaughter (R v Hopley) was an legal case in Eastbourne, England, about the death of a teenage pupil at the hands of his teacher, Thomas Hopley.

List of major crimes in the United Kingdom (Redirected from Major crimes in the United Kingdom.

The eastbourne manslaughter

This is a list of major crimes in the United Eastbourne manslaughter: 1: Eastbourne, England: year-old Reginald Cancellor died at the hands of his teacher, Thomas Hopley. Hopley used corporal punishment with the stated intention of .

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